Nebraska Animal Medical and Emergency Center

(402) 423-9100 5720 Old Cheney Rd
Lincoln, NE 68516

Business Hours

Mon – Thu: 7am – 9pm
Fri – Sun: 7:30am – 7:30pm
24/7 Emergency Services

Ask The Doctor

Spring Pet Poisons

Gardening season is here! Plant bulbs are just as excited to break through the ground to add some color to our yards as we are to see some greenery! That said, we need to be aware of the potential dangers spring plants can be for our pets. Here is a list of some of the most common spring plants and their toxicities… so you know how to pet-proof your garden and keep your pet safe.

Lawn and Garden Pesticides
Many lawn and garden pesticides are neurologically poisonous to pets. These include insecticidal aerosols, dips, and certain shampoo products. Additionally, using a flea control product that is intended for dogs on a cat can also result in poisoning.

Symptoms of toxicity include apprehension; excessive salivation, urination, and defecation; tremors; seizures; hyper-excitability; depression; and pinpoint pupils. If sufficient neurological toxin has been ingested, sudden death may be the only sign.

Rat and Mouse Poisons
Coumarins (D-Con) are rat and mouse poisons that affect the blood’s ability to clot. Mice that ingest this poison essentially bleed to death. Your pets can be affected the same way, even if they eat a mouse that has been poisoned.

Symptoms of poisoning include labored breathing; anorexia; nosebleeds; bloody urine or feces; and pinpoint hemorrhages of the gums. If you observe any of these symptoms, contact your veterinarian immediately.

Other Toxins

The list below is a guide to common house and garden plans and foods that are toxic to most animals and children. If your home contains any of these items, you need to keep them away from animals. For a more complete list of toxins, go to Pet Poison Helpline.

Cardiovascular Toxins

  • Avocado (leaves, seeds, stem, fruit, skin) to birds and pocket pets
  • Azalea (entire rhododendron family)
  • Bleeding heart
  • Castor bean
  • Foxglove (Digitalis)
  • Japanese pieris
  • Kalanchoe
  • Lily-of-the-valley
  • Mistletoe berries
  • Mountain laurel Oleander
  • Hyacinth bulbs
  • Hydrangea
  • Rosary Pea
  • Tobacco Products Yew


Gastrointestinal Toxins

  • Avocado (leaves, seeds, stem, fruit, skin) to dogs
  • Amaryllis bulb
  • Azalea (entire rhododendron family)
  • Bleeding heart
  • Buckeye caffeine castor bean
  • Chocolate
  • Choke cherry, unripe berries
  • Chrysanthemum (natural source of pyrethrins)
  • Crocus bulb, delphinium, larkspur, monkshood
  • Eggplant
  • Jimson weed
  • Lupine species
  • Macadamia nuts
  • Marijuana (Cannabis)
  • Morning glory
  • Moldy foods
  • Tobacco products
  • Potato (leaves and stem)
  • Tomatoes (leaves and stem)

Kidney/Organ Failure Toxins

  • Amanita mushrooms
  • Anthurium
  • Asiatic lily
  • Begonia
  • Calla lily
  • Castor beans
  • Day lily
  • Elephant’s ear
  • Easter lily
  • Grapes/raisins
  • Jack-in-the-pulpit
  • Lantana
  • Oak
  • Rhubarb leaves
  • Scheffelera
  • Shamrock
  • Stargazer lily

Neurological Toxins

  • Alcohol (all beverages, ethanol, methanol, isopropyl)
  • Amaryllis bulb
  • Azalea (entire rhododendron family)
  • Bleeding heart
  • Buckeye Caffeine Castor bean
  • Chocolate
  • Choke cherry, unripe berries
  • Chrysanthemum (natural source of pyrethrins)
  • Crocus bulb Delphinium, larkspur, monkshood
  • Eggplant
  • Jimson weed
  • Lupine species
  • Macadamia nuts
  • Marijuana (Cannabis)
  • Morning glory
  • Moldy foods
  • Tobacco products
  • Potato (leaves and stem)
  • Tomatoes (leaves and stem)

Kidney/Organ Failure Toxins

  • Amanita mushrooms
  • Anthurium
  • Asiatic lily
  • Begonia
  • Calla lily
  • Castor beans
  • Day lily
  • Elephant’s ear
  • Easter lily
  • Grapes/raisons
  • Jack-in-the-pulpit
  • Lantana
  • Oak
  • Rhubarb leaves
  • Scheffelera
  • Shamrock
  • Star-gazer Lilly

Toxins that affect the blood

  • Onions
  • Garlic

Treatment

If you discover that your pet may have ingested a poisonous plant or substance, immediately call Nebraska Animal Medical and Emergency Center at 402-423-9100.

Nebraska Animal Medical and Emergency Center is available 24/7 for emergency phone consultations. When need arises a NAMC veterinarian is on call in case of emergency examinations.

Appointments

We will do our best to accommodate your busy schedule. Please schedule an appointment today!

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